Monday, September 20, 2010

Madharasapattinam Video Songs-HQ



Review:

Banner: AGS Entertainment, Red Giant Movies
Production: Kalpathy S Agoram
Direction: A.L. Vijay
Star-casts: Aarya, Amy Jackson, Nasser, V.M.C. Haneefa, Bala Singh, M.S. Bhaskar, Omar, Periya Karuppu Devar, Balaji
Music: G.V. Prakash
Cinematography: Nirav Shah
Editing: Anthony
Art: V. Selvakumar

The eminent filmmaker Priyadarshan was well known for his versatile style of making period films. Of course, his films – 'Sirai Chaalai' (Kalapani) and 'Kanchivaram' were intensively substantial. These masterpieces carried top notching elements over technical aspects and narrative panoramas. Having assisted this genius, Vijay has attempted to make a similar period film that has pre-independence backdrop. Nonetheless, the film turns to be a displeasing movie as it lacks everything on narrative aspects. But to mention the best part, it's the technical realms that make the next 2.5hrs quite occupied for the audiences.

The film opens at the present-age in London, where an old woman nearing her last stage of life wants to visit India. Just as she travels along to Chennai, the story shifts to the flashback of 1947, as she arrives in Madharasapattinam (ancient Madras) as Amy (Amy Jackson), and beautiful daughter of British Governor. On her reaching, she falls in love with an Indian Dhobi Ilamparithi (Aarya), who's a wrestler as well. Rest of the film is about their love story narrated with the present and flashback cuts from Old Amy’s point of view with a shocking climax, though predictable.

The first thing that comes to your mind soon after the title credits is all that reminds about James Cameron's 'Titanic'. The old lady glimpsing back on her past with a 'Thali' in her hand is something so emotionally bonding. But as the flashback goes on, the complete first hour lacks proper substance and even the second half except the penultimate sequences is so boring.

Aarya's performance as a Dhobi and wrestler is great as he emotes stunningly towards certain sequence. British girl Amy is as doubtful before the lens as she looks unconfident during more sequences. She looks beautiful as a Barbie doll and there's nothing much we get to appreciate her. Late actor Haneefa has done a good job while other actors like M.S. Bhaskar, the British cop and others haven't got much to score.

The story travels much similar to Titanic as the girl is engaged to a baddie and falls in love with another man and they face the oppositions. The reason for a British Governor's daughter falling in love with an ordinary Dhobi is not convincing. There should have been at least a single solid reason to support it. Is that a crush, lust or love – it's really doubtful to make the exact point… Very few scenes really do entertain and the audiences across villages and suburban regions may not find this film to be really good. Most of the English oriented dialogues maybe puzzling although provided with Tamil subtitles.

Kudos to the technicians – both cinematographer Nirav Shah and Art director Selvakumar have done a great job. Their earnest efforts of presenting the best visuals are commendable while editing is okay. G.V. Prakash's background is average and none of the songs sustain in your senses.

Being set in backdrops of pre-independence era, Vijay has sidelined them thereby focusing on love story of this duo. Vijay should have come up with an impressive story with brilliant narration rather this one looks so unskilled on script, screenplay and direction.

Verdict: Vijay's amateurish attempt


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